Information & History

Additional Information

The Sphynx cat is a very unusual and rare breed. They are often referred to as the Canadian Hairless Cat. They have very little fur and lack of whiskers. What fur some Sphynx cats may have will appear as a very fine down. The skin of the Sphynx can exhibit colors and markings and they have sometime been mistaken for Chihuahuas.


The face of the Sphynx is quite expressive and dominated by its large eyes and ears. Naturally occurring skin oils means that the Sphynx needs occasional bath. This is an intelligent cat that is devoted to favored humans. Affectionate and playful, this unique breed can make a great companion cat.


Sphynx Cat History

The Sphynx cat originated from a natural mutation in a kitten born in Toronto, Canada in 1966. The Cat Fanciers Association included this breed in the miscellaneous category in February 1998 and championship show recognition in 2002.

The ancestor of all domestic cats is the African Wildcat, the genus Felis Lybica. This genus is comprised of smaller cats. Cats are thought to have been domesticated with the advent of farming and the storage of grain. The grain attracted rats and other vermin which naturally attracted wild cats. As time evolved, certain of these cats were domesticated for the mutual benefit of both cat and man. The African Wildcat has certain features which is obvious in the housecat of today.


Feline Health Considerations

Cats who reside in the house should generally visit the veterinarian yearly, unless health problems are evident. Cats who enjoy the outdoors may need to see the vet as many as four times a year. When you take your cat to the vet, be sure to bring along a fresh stool sample so the vet can do a fecal exam to check for internal parasites such as tapeworm, round worm, whip worms and hook worms. The vet will also check for external parasites such as fleas, ticks and ear mites.

Any vet check should include a dental examination and a cleaning if necessary. Cats who are eight years of age or older are considered geriatric and additional blood and urine tests may be necessary to screen for any health problems. At about six months of age, the kitten should also be examined for sexual maturity and decisions about birth control should be made.


Behavioral Traits

Gets along with other pets
They like to cuddle and snuggle
Very friendly and outgoing
They like to be the center of attention



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Disclamer

Every cat and kitten is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your cat or kitten. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.


*Information on this page was borrowed with permission from joyofsphynx.com*